Muppet Robin Hood 4 (July 2009)

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The series isn’t terrible; it has cute finish. Not a particularly successful one, but a cute one. There’s a lot of goofiness, not just in the narrative but in the handling of it.

For example, when Disney gave Boom! the kids comic license, were they aware Boom! was going to do a page and a half of text with some nonsense about the writer disappearing? It’s supposed to be funny, but it falls flat (a Boom! comic making jokes about bad writing in Hollywood when so many of their projects have been Hollywood-bound properties is just lame).

Speaking of lame, the Crusades are a rock band, led by Pepe the King Prawn (get it, king?). I’m assuming this “creative” decision was made for kids, who aren’t going to learn about the Crusades in school so why should they learn about them in a comic book.

It’s a weak move.

CREDITS

Writer, Tim Beedle; artist, Armand Villavert Jr.; colorist, Kat Valliant; letterer, Marshall M. Dillon; editors, Paul Morrisey and Aaron Sparrow; publisher, Boom! Studios.

Muppet Robin Hood 3 (June 2009)

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Beedle comes closer to–no pun intended–making a bullseye this issue than the previous two suggested he was capable of doing. There’s some of the silly anachronisms, but even they don’t stand in the way of it finally turning into a Robin Hood story.

I can’t remember if the archery contest is a Robin Hood standard (I know the Little John fight on the bridge is one and I sort of remember the contest from Disney’s Robin Hood), but it provides Beedle with some action and a dictated pace. Trying to tell a Muppets story in summary apparently hasn’t been working for Robin Hood and now, with the bad guys being bad, not funny, it’s getting good.

There are still a lot of solid jokes–Fozzie following Sam Eagle around with a little Sam Eagle doll is hilarious, even if it doesn’t technically fit–and the cameos are better.

CREDITS

Writer, Tim Beedle; artist, Armand Villavert Jr.; colorist, Kat Valliant; letterer, Marshall M. Dillon; editors, Paul Morrisey and Aaron Sparrow; publisher, Boom! Studios.

Muppet Robin Hood 2 (May 2009)

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The second issue is more of the first, but with more of the primary Muppets. What’s with Gonzo, by the way? It seems like no one can draw Gonzo to really resemble the actual Muppet?

The best thing about this issue are Johnny Fiama and Sal. Johnny’s playing the evil prince and Sal’s there too. Johnny’s prince is almost too addle-brained to be a sinister villain and Sal’s too funny to dislike (unfortunately, the comic cuts before Gonzo gets dunked in a tank–as torture, which he’s thrilled to be enduring since it gives him a chance to escape, Gonzo the Great and all), which means the book doesn’t really have a bad guy.

Unfortunately, it also doesn’t have much of a story. It’s ostensibly Robin Hood, but it’s not a faithful retelling of the legend (another difference from Christmas Carol and Treasure Island). It’s too loose, too scattershot.

CREDITS

Writer, Tim Beedle; artist, Armand Villavert Jr.; colorist, Mara Aum; letterer, Marshall M. Dillon; editors, Paul Morrisey and Aaron Sparrow; publisher, Boom! Studios.

Muppet Robin Hood 1 (April 2009)

I guess they don’t get it. I mean, maybe they do, but maybe not. Muppet Robin Hood reminds me of one of those licensed properties where they have a partial license, like when Dark Horse had The Terminator but not Terminator 2 and so couldn’t refer to it. Muppet Robin Hood plays like an overlong “Muppet Show” skit instead of like one of the themed Muppet movies (A Muppet Christmas Carol, Muppet Treasure Island). There’s a lot of intentional anachronisms and they aren’t funny.

Where the comic works is when it’s not trying too hard–miniature golf in Middle Ages–you can practically see the laughter sign lighting up–when the jokes aren’t forced and sort of occur organically.

But it’s a wordy comic for, presumably, a younger audience. There’s lots of exposition (the exposition is solidly amusing) and then lots of dialogue.

Not a bad comic; not good either.

CREDITS

Writer, Tim Beedle; artist, Armand Villavert Jr.; colorist, Mara Aum; letterer, Marshall M. Dillon; editors, Paul Morrisey and Aaron Sparrow; publisher, Boom! Studios.

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