The Mighty 6 (September 2009)

mighty-6.jpg

What an issue. The pacing is awful–I’m pretty sure it took me about three minutes to read–because the whole thing is just a conversation. After discovering, Alpha One is nuts or something, protagonist–the first time I’ve ever referred to him as such–Gabe hangs out with Alpha One in space for a really creepy moment.

Then the rest of the issue is Gabe trying to tell his wife Alpha One is a nutso without Alpha One hearing but Alpha One does hear.

It’s not so much a weak issue as it is a weak half issue. The Mighty, for a twelve issue limited (or whatever, it was going to be ongoing at one point, right?), is seriously lacking any subplots. It’s all about Gabe discovering Alpha One is a fruitcake bad guy masquerading as a good guy. Or something along those lines.

But it’s got no texture.

CREDITS

Blue Moon; writers, Peter J. Tomasi and Keith Champagne; artist, Chris Samnee; colorist, John Kalisz; letterer, Rob Leigh; editors, Chris Conroy and Joey Cavalieri; publisher, DC Comics.

The Mighty 5 (August 2009)

mighty-5.jpg

For Samnee’s first issue, apparently Tomasi and Champagne aren’t going to beat around the bush. Alpha One goes from being a hero with some quirks to being an intergalactic villain. Well, maybe not intergalactic–the alien things on the last page look a lot like something out of War of the Worlds.

Samnee’s art, which is even less superhero style than Snejbjerg’s, fits the series, though it’s unfair to compare the two because Samnee isn’t tasked with trying to infer deception behind Alpha One’s otherwise heroic demeanor.

What’s shocking about the issue is how fast Tomasi and Champagne introduce the bad stuff–there’s a lot of implications against Alpha One–before he goes and murders someone. After spending three and a half issues being cagey about it, The Mighty enters Irredeemable territory–the two books premiered around the same time, which is interesting. No one talked about The Mighty though.

CREDITS

World Gone Wrong; writers, Peter J. Tomasi and Keith Champagne; artist, Chris Samnee; colorist, John Kalisz; letterer, Rob Leigh; editors, Chris Conroy and Joey Cavalieri; publisher, DC Comics.

The Mighty 4 (July 2009)

mighty-4.jpg

Ok, even if a commenter hadn’t given away the ominousness I’m feeling, this issue would have pretty much done it. There’s a lot of Alpha One being really, really weird here.

As far as Snejbjerg’s art and the changing face of Alpha One, I think he’s trying to intimate there’s something else going on but it’s just not coming off well. Instead of different expressions, it’s different faces entirely.

Tomasi and Champagne borrow another Superman movie scene here too, this time from Superman III. Given The Mighty appears to be a superhero going bad or superhero with lots of secrets book, like Irredeemable or, to some extent, Incognito, it’s surprising it doesn’t comment on superhero comics as much as it uses culturally ingrained superhero conventions (for a particularly age group at least).

It’s an interesting series; a complete second reading, once finished with the twelve issues, might be quite useful.

CREDITS

Everybody Pays; writers, Peter J. Tomasi and Keith Champagne; artist, Peter Snejbjerg; colorist, John Kalisz; letterer, Rob Leigh; editors, Chris Conroy and Joey Cavalieri; publisher, DC Comics.

The Mighty 3 (June 2009)

mighty-3.jpg

I’m reading The Mighty about as blind as anyone can read anything. I picked it up because of Tomasi and Snejbjerg reuniting after that angel one they did. Well, mostly because of Snejbjerg (so it’s hilarious it’s his contribution I have the most issue with, once again, his faces are way too loose, way too inconsistent–I get he goes for iconic with the superhero sometimes, but it looks like a completely different guy in close-ups).

In other words, I have no idea what’s going on. Either it’s about a superhero who’s got some issues–he busts in on his handler’s home life either out of overzealousness or to prove a point to the handler’s wife he’s number one, same goes for letting his handler almost suffocate in a room of his secret headquarters.

And there’s even more.

While I like not knowing, I’m also worried I’m just projecting.

CREDITS

Dirge; writers, Peter J. Tomasi and Keith Champagne; artist, Peter Snejbjerg; colorist, John Kalisz; letterer, Rob Leigh; editors, Chris Conroy and Joey Cavalieri; publisher, DC Comics.

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: