Captain America: Man out of Time 2 (February 2011)

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I hate how I dull so quickly to bad art. Molina hasn’t gotten any better, but because I know what to expect (what not to expect, more like), I’m comfortable.

This issue gets a lot more traditional. It’s not about Cap moving through time, it’s a retelling of him waking up; this time it’s when Obama’s President and Rick Jones has a gang of cyber-buddies helping him track supervillains. I’m not sure the Rick Jones and his Internet flunkies works though… Waid should have used Twitter.

So, in other words, it’s not the awesome thing I thought it would be from the first issue. Instead, it’s reasonably solid. Waid can write this stuff—he even writes a lot of it quite well (though he does have Cap thinking in a report to his commanding officer again). And notice, I’m not calling Cap Steve… Waid doesn’t humanize.

Still, it’s okay.

CREDITS

Writer, Mark Waid; penciller, Jorge Molina; inker, Karl Kesel; colorist, Frank D’Armata; letterer, Joe Sabino; editors, Lauren Sankovitch and Tom Brevoort; publisher, Marvel Comics.

Captain America: Man out of Time 1 (January 2011)

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Molina’s artwork is truly hideous. It’s goofy and bulky and… it’s indescribably awful. The crisp coloring doesn’t help either.

That complaint made, Man out of Time is actually pretty interesting. Waid makes a serious goof with Cap dictating a report to his superior in his head during his first encounter with the Avengers, but otherwise… huh.

I had no idea what to expect going into the series, but the first issue suggests it’s Cap unbound in time, moving from point to point; Waid’s dealing with the character primarily as an icon. The issue opens with him and Bucky and Bucky’s definitely the one doing the heavy lifting as far as protagonist duties go. It’s post-Brubaker revisionist WWII Bucky, but Waid brings a lot of welcome levity to the character.

It’s like Waid tries to surprise every two pages. He succeeds.

Art aside, I’m looking forward to reading this one.

CREDITS

Writer, Mark Waid; penciller, Jorge Molina; inker, Karl Kesel; colorist, Frank D’Armata; letterer, Joe Sabino; editors, Lauren Sankovitch and Tom Brevoort; publisher, Marvel Comics.

Swamp Thing 6 (September-October 1973)

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It’s sort of amusing how Wein can construct these fantastic, devastatingly emotional moments for Swamp Thing… but still have inane plotting. This issue, Swamp Thing finds a little Swiss town in Vermont. He also discovers himself (as a human) and his dead wife living happily there. Wein soon reveals a Swiss clockmaker spent the thirty years putting together a town of androids, their identities from the obits. It’s purely coincidental he picked Alec and Linda Holland. Swamp Thing has some beautiful, depressing scenes with his wife’s android stand-in.

Now, Matt Cable and Abby show up—because no one in town has been filing their taxes. Matt’s gone from CIA agent to Interpol agent to IRS agent in six issues. Wein doesn’t acknowledge no one in town would file their taxes because they don’t have any income. They’re aware they’re robots.

Still, great art, memorable issue; albeit contrived Wein plotting.

CREDITS

A Clockwork Horror; writer, Len Wein; artist, Bernie Wrightson; editor, Joe Orlando; publisher, DC Comics.

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