Invisible Republic 2 (April 2015)

Invisible Republic #2

This issue of Invisible Republic has a little too much flashback and not enough with the reporter in the present. The problem is how little the flashback stuff actually matters; sure, the girl is sympathetic, but only because she’s in an unfair situation and she has a psycho future-dictator for a cousin.

The stuff in the present is actually, if underrepresented as far as the narrative, less interesting than the flashback. The present feels too 1984-lite at times, while the stuff in the past feels like sci-fi caste system stuff. Far more interesting.

Hardman and Bechko have put a lot of thought into Invisible Republic, so much they’re clearing spinning their wheels at times to see how Hardman’s going to visualize that spinning (well, he visualizes it well). The enthusiasm gets the comic past its various bumps and it’s an engaging read.

But flashback cliffhangers are weak.

CREDITS

Writers, Gabriel Hardman and Corinna Bechko; artist, Hardman; colorist, Jordan Boyd; publisher, Image Comics.

War Stories 7 (March 2015)

War Stories #7

Garth Ennis is back to form on War Stories; his artist, Tomas Aira, is probably worse than the last time I saw him working on the book (could’ve been last issue… he’s not memorable).

But what is memorable is Ennis’s setup for this story. German civilians leaving Russian–in January 1945–the Russians kind of not making it easy for them to leave. It’s a refuge story from the perspective of a German girl. Ennis is trying again with War Stories; he’s trying really hard.

The story has action and a fair bit of drama. There’s no humor, except when the narrator too is aware of the irony of the jokes. Ennis does a great job establishing his cast members when not even giving them distinct enough names. The action goes okay but the drama’s all beautifully paced dialogue exchanges from Ennis.

Nice to see him caring about it again.

CREDITS

The Last German Winter, Part One: Babes in the Woods; writer, Garth Ennis; artist, Tomas Aira; colorist, Digikore Studios; letterer, Kurt Hathaway; publisher, Avatar Press.

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