Manifest Destiny 22 (August 2016)

Manifest Destiny #22

No way, Sacagawea gets something to do. Not a lot, but Dingess actually gives her something to do. Then he skips out on the leads of Manifest Destiny and heads into the past for the flashback. Lots and lots of flashback. The longer it goes on, the more fantastic Dingess is going to have to tie it into the present action. Something really lame with the journal from the flashback, perhaps. Though it makes no sense at this point how the guy could be journaling his adventures.

There’s some great art from Roberts and Tony Akins and Stefano Gaudiano because there’s always great art in Manifest Destiny. This issue doesn’t have much but great art. Well, it does have one surprise choice. I mean, there are a lot of “twists” this issue in the flashback, but it only has one surprise. Unfortunately, Dingess has used up any goodwill when it comes to expecting his cliffhanger moments to go somewhere good. Destiny is a plodding book these days.

The present action is extremely minimal. Lewis and Clark are interchangeable. Dingess has killed the pace of the comic. Yet it’s hard not for the book to compel on some level–Roberts doing this Corps of Discovery Expedition with monsters, it’s really a cool thing. There’s also some really uncool magical stuff.

Manifest Destiny desperately needs editors who can reign Dingess in, who can help break out a story, who can keep the book on track. Until then, I go into every issue expecting it to be my last.

CREDITS

Sasquatch, Part Four; writer, Chris Dingess; penciller, Matthew Roberts; inkers, Tony Akins and Stefano Gaudiano; colorist, Owen Gieni; letterer, Pat Brosseau; editors, Arielle Basich and Sean Mankiewicz; publisher, Image Comics.

Spidey Zine (2016)

Spidey Zine

Spidey Zine, a fan made “little comic collection” from Hannah Blumenreich, is wonderful. Some of the strips run a couple pages, some run longer. Blumenreich identifies the adorable and the admirable in Peter Parker. Reading Spidey Zine, you totally understand why Betty Brant went for him back in Amazing #7.

Yeah, a bit of warning–Spidey Zine makes you proud of all your Spider-Man knowledge, whether you’re happy to have it or not. Blumenreich even makes some fundamentally uncool things like the Ben Reilly Scarlet Spider costume design wonderful.

But Blumenreich isn’t as interested in Spider-Man as the superhero as she is in Peter Parker, the awkward teenager who puts on a costume and defends Queens. There’s a poignancy to the comic, an fundamental understanding of not just what makes the character tick, but what makes the character so beloved. The idealism.

While Spidey Zine does focus on exploring Peter Parker as Spider-Man, there is still quite a bit looking at how Spider-Man exists in the world. For Peter, for May, for the people Spider-Man helps. Blumenreich perfectly balances everything in these strips. How much verisimilitude, how much danger, how much humor.

Basically, Marvel should start throwing money at Blumenreich.

You can read Spidey Zine for free. If you read Spider-Man, if you watched “Amazing Friends”, if you know what the “Clone Saga” means, if you just like good comic strips–Blumenreich’s style feels like a long-form comic strip….

Spidey Zine is spectacularly amazing.

CREDITS

Writer and artist, Hannah Blumenreich.

Freely available, https://gumroad.com/hannahblmnrch/.

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