The Spider King #2 (March 2018)

The Spider King #2

Yep, I’ll bet Spider King reads better in one sitting.

This issue has the goofy ball underdog king getting his hands on an alien arsenal. There’s an alien around, but he’s not mean. He’s cute, in fact, and utterly unimpressed with the Vikings’ intelligence.

There’s a little with the evil uncle melding with the evil alien. Some real cool art from D’Armini on those pages. The comic slows down for a second and demands your attention to its detail. Then it speeds back up, with the Viking princess finding an arsenal of her own and a kid for a sidekick.

They get arrows whereas King Goofball gets swords and other types of weapons. Ones he and his clan members can’t really figure out how to use. Not good since there are now bad aliens hunting them. These bad aliens look different from the cute alien and the evil alien, who are at least both blue and somewhat similar.

Good art, okay script, way too fast of a pace.

:

CREDITS

The Treasures of Valhalla; writer, Josh Vann; artist, Simone D’Armini; colorist, Adrian Bloch; letterer, Nic J Shaw; editors, Chas! Pangburn and Sarah Gaydos; publisher, IDW Publishing.</p

I Hate Fairyland #16 (February 2018)

I Hate Fairyland #16

Uh. So Young opens the issue with Gert talking about how the previous issue’s cliffhanger for Fairyland was manipulative and cheap.

Which is fine. Kind of funny.

But then this entire issue is manipulative and cheap as it undoes that cliffhanger.

The issue’s a dream sequence (basically), not just without anything to move the story forward, but without anything to give Gert good fodder. She gets chased, she gets upset, she gets mean, but there’s no real oomph to the new situation.

And the setting isn’t conducive to Young’s art style. Maybe if it were half the issue (or a third), but an entire issue of boring visualizations. Sure, there’s a little bit of Fairyland, but it’s that happy-go-lucky Fairyland, not the regular bloodbath Gert makes it.

As a series, Young’s worked out how to best play to his (and Fairyland’s) strengths. But now it’s like he’s floundering. And issue #16 isn’t a place to be floundering.

CREDITS

Writer and artist, Skottie Young; colorist, Jean-Francois Bealieu; letterer, Nate Piekos; editor, Kent Wagenschutz; publisher, Image Comics.

Deathbed #1 (April 2018)

Deathbed #1

I’ve been reading indie books so long I forgot what Vertigo pacing feels like. Besides the pacing, Deathbed actually doesn’t feel too much like a “Vertigo book.” Sure, the witty, buxom female protagonist feels like a Vertigo book–oh, no, am I going to regret saying it didn’t feel like a Vertigo book–but the subject of the book doesn’t feel like a Vertigo “hero.”

Deathbed is about a failing writer who agrees to ghostwrite the autobiography of some guy she’s never heard of. But he’s rich. And it turns out he’s a monster hunter. It’s never clear whether or not the protagonist–Val–is aware there are monsters. It’s a problem, but writer Joshua Williamson skips over it. He’s got the issue to finish.

It’s going to be six issues, which is probably fine. Nothing much happens here–not in terms of establishing the protagonist (though it’s entirely possible she’s not going to get any more character than she’s got at the end of issue one)–except there’s eventually mummies attacking a naked old (but astoundingly fit) guy and him killing them all.

It’s not a spoiler. It’s kind of the point of the book. He’s on his final quest–rid the world of bad guys until one of them kills him. Val, ghostwriter, will be there to watch.

Riley Rossmo’s art is all right, but the book’s so rushed there’s not a lot of time to appreciate it. There’s a strange reliance on double page spreads, which just hurry things along even more.

Deathbed needs to slow down.

CREDITS

Writer, Joshua Williamson; artist, Riley Rossmo; colorist, Ivan Plascencia; letterer, Deron Bennett; editor, Amedeo Turturro; publisher, Vertigo.

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: