The Marvels Project 8 (July 2010)

654236.jpg

Brubaker ties it up neatly to the first issue, which I wasn’t expecting. Low and behold, the Destroyer doesn’t get a mention, but Nick Fury does return for some nonsense.

So… one of the plot points is a secret Nazi attack on December 7, 1941, an attack Captain America, Bucky and Namor foil. An attack Captain America keeps secret from the world so the sacrifice of the people at Pearl Harbor isn’t cheapened.

How does Brubaker tell that story? By cheapening Pearl Harbor. Real life and superheroes don’t mix well. Look at Superman IV. I remember Brubaker once laughed at the idea of Cap hunting down Osama Bin Laden. I guess having him fight historically inaccurate Nazis during Pearl Harbor is different.

Though beautifully illustrated, Brubaker’s approach to Pearl Harbor is horrifyingly… I don’t know… exploitative? Artistically depraved? Soullessly shallow?

It’s easily the worst writing of his I’ve ever read.

CREDITS

Writer, Ed Brubaker; artist, Steve Epting; colorist, Dave Stewart; letterer, Chris Eliopoulos; editors, Lauren Sankovitch and Tom Brevoort; publisher, Marvel Comics.

The Marvels Project 7 (May 2010)

654235.jpg

So the Angel–he’s the narrator of the Marvels Project for those who don’t remember–also, that big government project to develop superman? The “Ultimatizing,” it’s forgotten too. Anyway, the Angel actually gets to appear this issue… to play second fiddle to Cap and Bucky.

Outside Brubaker and Epting’s Captain America, I haven’t seen a Bucky like this one–the commando Bucky. Brubaker tries to work that origin in, matching the existing and fails here. Comes off silly. This issue almost makes me think the whole impetus for the series was just to show Bucky in the forties with a machine gun.

Some nice art from Epting and a lot of boring expository narration make this issue another mixed bag. Brubaker introduces another character this issue–the Destroyer–but has seemingly forgotten about Nick Fury. But, then again, so did I.

I bet next issue ends with the Invaders forming….

CREDITS

Writer, Ed Brubaker; artist, Steve Epting; colorist, Dave Stewart; letterer, Chris Eliopoulos; editors, Lauren Sankovitch and Tom Brevoort; publisher, Marvel Comics.

The Marvels Project 6 (April 2010)

IMG_0024.JPG

Is it a good issue? Umm. Depends. I mean, does a comic book have to be well-written to be good? Comics can survive bad art better than bad writing and by no means is this issue poorly written. Brubaker turns in a completely disinterested script, but it’s not bad. He dehumanizes some Germans too, quite a change from a few issues ago.

But this issue features a fight between the Torch and Namor and a huge tidal wave hitting Manhattan (I think this fight happened in Marvels too). But it’s completely amazing to look at. Epting’s art is wondrous.

So it’s a good issue, but not for anything save Epting’s visualization of that scene. Actually, it’s aloof in some ways (Brubaker’s young Captain America is just as in charge as his old Captain America, which doesn’t seem right) and still rather boring.

The narrator doesn’t even appear in closeup.

CREDITS

Writer, Ed Brubaker; artist, Steve Epting; colorist, Dave Stewart; letterer, Chris Eliopoulos; editors, Lauren Sankovitch and Tom Brevoort; publisher, Marvel Comics.

The Marvels Project 5 (March 2010)

654233.jpg

I guess this issue is the best one so far. I mean, the Angel goes out and does stuff this issue, meets Captain America, gets shot. It’s more than he’s done since the first issue.

The Red Skull, the beautiful Epting Red Skull, shows up this issue too. I’m a little confused about Steele guy, seems like he’d have been a bigger character, but whatever. It’s the first issue in a while I don’t regret having spent the time reading. Even through the first half, all the summary storytelling, Epting’s art is really nice.

Then there’s an action scene at the end, also very nice. Epting does well with the static imagery, but he does wonderful with action scenes.

Brubaker doesn’t do any more of his Nazi humanizing here (though he does make some worse than others), which would have disappointed me if I hadn’t had nice things to say.

CREDITS

Writer, Ed Brubaker; artist, Steve Epting; colorist, Dave Stewart; letterer, Chris Eliopoulos; editors, Lauren Sankovitch and Tom Brevoort; publisher, Marvel Comics.

The Marvels Project 4 (February 2010)

744853.jpg

Good grief, halfway in and we’re not even to Captain America yet. Brubaker’s cliffhanger this issue is just become the injection. It’s such a waste of time. If it weren’t for Epting’s New York street scene and Brubaker humanizing a Nazi, I’d be done.

Let me elaborate. Epting’s art at least makes it worth looking at. Brubaker humanizing Nazis? That one might make for some amusing response.

I’m sure Brubaker thought he was doing something edgy and artistic, but he’s also the guy who backs down when the Tea Party talks smack about him. I guess he doesn’t care what anti-Nazi readers think of him.

It also occurred to me, this issue, this comic would be fine if it weren’t for all the big Marvel stuff. If it were just the Angel and the forgotten WWII characters, it would be decent or better.

Instead, it’s a really big disappointment.

CREDITS

Writer, Ed Brubaker; artist, Steve Epting; colorist, Dave Stewart; letterer, Chris Eliopoulos; editors, Lauren Sankovitch and Tom Brevoort; publisher, Marvel Comics.

The Marvels Project 3 (December 2009)

654231.jpg

The Marvels Project, Epting or no Epting, all of a sudden seems like a bad choice for Brubaker. Why not get Jeff Parker, who loves doing revisionist stories of old characters. I suppose I made that suggestion thinking Parker would have more creative control, but even if he didn’t–did anyone think Brubaker was just clamoring to retell Marvels in more issues–at least Parker would show some interest.

I doubt anyone was really excited at the idea of retelling Marvels, but more, who wants to read a retelling of Marvels? That book isn’t old, isn’t out of print. It’s even concise. Marvels Project is not concise. And after the second Marvels series, who thought another one was a good idea?

The comic still doesn’t have a protagonist. It has a narrator but no protagonist. That condition might make it unique.

It appears to be a pretty waste of time.

CREDITS

Writer, Ed Brubaker; artist, Steve Epting; colorist, Dave Stewart; letterer, Chris Eliopoulos; editors, Lauren Sankovitch and Tom Brevoort; publisher, Marvel Comics.

The Marvels Project 2 (November 2009)

prv3342themarvelsprojec.jpg

Does anything happen this issue? I will definitely say it doesn’t tread over Marvels territory at all and does introduce one or two interesting things–the image of the Human Torch working on controlling his flames in a hayloft–but otherwise, nothing happens.

The narrator–this issue revealed to be a costumed adventurer himself, the Angel–talks a bit and Brubaker does fine with that narration, but so much of the story doesn’t have anything to so with the narrator, it’s hard not to think mostly about why Brubaker’s bothering with one.

Nearly everything else, from the 1940s NYPD being unsympathetic to Nick Fury breaking out the Captain America serum scientist (will they explain why Fury doesn’t age as fast in this series, I never can remember why he doesn’t), is all pretty standard. The art is nice, some of it really nice.

The plot just is not compelling enough.

CREDITS

Writer, Ed Brubaker; artist, Steve Epting; colorist, Dave Stewart; letterer, Chris Eliopoulos; editors, Lauren Sankovitch and Tom Brevoort; publisher, Marvel Comics.

The Marvels Project 1 (October 2009)

654229.jpg

I really need a cast of characters page. It’s neat how Brubaker uses the Two-Gun Kid to open (though I can’t remember how he got to the future in the Slott She-Hulk series); it gives the story something of a context in the modern Marvel Universe, since it really is just another retcon. Just one without a lot of repercussions.

Following all their Captain America flashbacks, Epting and Brubaker are perfectly assured and the comic does read well.

It just isn’t particularly necessary. It appears to tie a bunch of old events together under the purview of the United States government (to “Ultimatize” regular Marvel history). There’s an FDR cameo and Nick Fury shows up and we get some really good Namor stuff… But it’s really just another Marvels, with a different narrator on a somewhat wider perspective.

Decent Marvel–Brubaker’s capable of a whole lot more though.

CREDITS

Writer, Ed Brubaker; artist, Steve Epting; colorist, Dave Stewart; letterer, Chris Eliopoulos; editors, Jeanine Schaefer and Tom Brevoort; publisher, Marvel Comics.

Marvels: Eye of the Camera 6 (April 2010)

marvels-2-6.jpg

Okay, so Busiek doesn’t pull it off, not saving the whole series, not even saving the whole issue, but when he has the chance to be a right cheap bastard and have the mutant girl be a hallucination of a dying cancer patient… he doesn’t do it. He doesn’t do the M. Night Shyamalan ending. He does the work instead.

The ending doesn’t work–we never find out the title of the new book the protagonist was working on and there’s this whole emphasis on his concern for mutant rights–which started an issue ago, certainly not through the whole series–but most of the issue does.

Marvels: Eye of the Camera is a piece of shit. The only issue worth a cent, much less three hundred and ninety-nine of them, is this last one. It could have been a one shot. Would have been better as one too.

CREDITS

Closing the Book; writers, Kurt Busiek and Roger Stern; artist, Jay Anacleto; colorist, Brian Haberlin; letterers, Richard Starkings and Comicraft; editors, Lauren Sankovitch and Tom Brevoort; publisher, Marvel Comics.

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: