The Dead Hand #2 (May 2018)

The Dead Hand #2

Mooney has some real problems with faces. They’re way, way too static. He’s usually strong with detail and body language–though the double-page spreads recounting super spy behavior (with only the “hero” wearing a mask so it really is just him being a dork) are overkill.

Not a lot happens in the issue. The sheriff deals with the hiker. The teenage girls wonder what’s going on; turns out one of their mom’s is a former spy with a history with the sheriff. And knows what’s going on in the town. And is more in charge than the sheriff.

There are a couple surprises, with the second one being what seems to be a big ol’ twist, and Higgins handles it all quite well. The comic would read better if Mooney could do the talking heads without the characters overacting, but Dead Hand still has a strong hook to keep interest.

The way the issue ends, however, gives no clue as to where the book is going, which is fine… just strange given it’s a limited. Kind of a soft boot.

CREDITS

Writer, Kyle Higgins; artist, Stephen Mooney; colorist, Jordie Bellaire; letterer, Clayton Cowles; publisher, Image Comics.

The Dead Hand #1 (April 2018)

Writer Kyle Higgins likes his big concepts. The Dead Hand has a big concept, though that concept isn’t entirely clear yet. In fact, Higgins does some slight of hand to distract from things–though he forecasts the twist just before revealing it, a little too much of the hand showing. Most of the issue is some “rah rah” nonsense with an American CIA agent.

He’s a super spy, but he wears a star mask–like a bandana over his face with a star on it–presumably because he thinks it makes him cool. Or there are other costumed super spies and Higgins really needs to reveal it, because otherwise the super spy seems like a little bit of a tool.

Is the guy a tool? Maybe?

It’s not important yet. What’s important is there’s some big mystery involving a Soviet weapons project and a small mountain town pretending it’s in the United States but it’s really in Russia. Only not Soviet Russia, modern Russia.

Stephen Mooney’s art is all right. His figures get stumpy at times and he’s a little too ambitious with his angles for his depth, but it’s definitely all right.

The Starro mask is real dumb though. Like, I’m not sure it’ll ever live the Starro mask down.

CREDITS

Writer, Kyle Higgins; artist, Stephen Mooney; colorist, Jordie Bellaire; letterer, Clayton Cowles; publisher, Image Comics.

Hadrian’s Wall 7 (May 2017)

Hadrian's Wall #7

Three big things happen this issue. One is the semi-hard cliffhanger, another is the conclusion to the mystery, and the last is Eduardo Ferigato’s continued art assists. Ferigato, whatever he does, is a perfect pair for Reis. Hadrian’s Wall has always had excellent art, but Reis and Ferigato together give it a somewhat different look. Frizzy lines. It changes the energy of the book, just as Higgins and Siegel’s script changes up too. The pacing is different, more intense; the characters now have to synthesize to respond to the new situations. The book might just end a lot better than originally forecasted. One to go.

CREDITS

Writers, Kyle Higgins and Alec Siegel; artists, Rod Reis and Eduardo Ferigato; letterer, Troy Peteri; editor, Matt Idelson; publisher, Image Comics.

Hadrian’s Wall 6 (April 2017)

Hadrian's Wall #6

And another surprising turn of events. Higgins and Siegel were holding out, setting up a soap opera crime melodrama when they really had something else. The flashbacks are now slightly annoying, only because they feel like backstory Higgins and Siegel are doing out of obligation rather than dramatic gristle. They’re explanations of events discussed multiple times in exposition; exposition could’ve gotten the “truth” across as well. Reis has some help on the art–Eduardo Ferigato–and I’m curious where Ferigato came in. There’s some talking heads stuff and it’s okay, but it’s far from dynamic. Though Reis never does lengthy talking heads particularly well. But Hadrian’s Wall still has some surprises in store. It’s a good series. Higgins and Siegel might be in the victory lap with two to go.

CREDITS

Writers, Kyle Higgins and Alec Siegel; artists, Rod Reis and Eduardo Ferigato; letterer, Troy Peteri; editor, Matt Idelson; publisher, Image Comics.

Hadrian’s Wall 5 (March 2017)

Hadrian's Wall #5

Hadrian’s Wall runs eight issues. Why did I think it was five issues? I might have even thought it was four at some point. Needless to say, there’s a lot more story coming in this issue. A lot more backstory too. The detective is in a prolonged state of withdrawal, which sort of changes the flashbacks–if they’re occurring to him as they occur to the reader–but not a lot. It’s a smooth issue. Gets the rebel pirates introduced, puts these characters in this place; it’s a positioning issue. Higgins and Siegel are rearranging the board. Good art from Reis as always, but there’s not a lot for him to do. The settings are visually boring, actually.

CREDITS

Writers, Kyle Higgins and Alec Siegel; artist, Rod Reis; letterer, Troy Peteri; editor, Matt Idelson; publisher, Image Comics.

Hadrian’s Wall 4 (December 2016)

Hadrian's Wall #4

I have no idea what just happened. I mean, I do. Higgins and Siegel are straightforward writers, even when they’re doing flashbacks and big reveals in quick sequence. But it has a strange plot development for the first issue of the back three. And while there are flashbacks to Earth, all of a sudden Reis’s art feels more claustrophobic. As the stakes raise for the characters finally, it’s like the book’s visually closing in. It’s a good issue with some excellent work from Reis.

CREDITS

Writers, Kyle Higgins and Alec Siegel; artist, Rod Reis; letterer, Troy Peteri; editor, Matt Idelson; publisher, Image Comics.

Hadrian’s Wall 3 (November 2016)

Hadrian's Wall #3

Hadrian’s Wall just got somewhere very unexpected. It’s not clear if the writers are going to take the unexpected route or the familiar, but it’s an impressive narrative development. The issue’s methodical, which works, especially given the art. Reis has a great flow to the interrogation scenes.

CREDITS

Writers, Kyle Higgins and Alec Siegel; artist, Rod Reis; letterer, Troy Peteri; editor, Matt Idelson; publisher, Image Comics.

Hadrian’s Wall 2 (October 2016)

Hadrian's Wall #2

The issue’s a little drawn out as far as the script goes, but Reis’s art more than carries it along. And there’s some decent detective investigation exposition slash narration, with the detective recording his notes. But the soft cliffhanger’s weak. The writers take advantage of the medium.

CREDITS

Writers, Kyle Higgins and Alec Siegel; artist, Rod Reis; letterer, Troy Peteri; editor, Matt Idelson; publisher, Image Comics.

Hadrian’s Wall 1 (September 2016)

Hadrian's Wall #1

Hadrian’s Wall opens with a paragraph explaining the setting–it’s set in an alternate future because it has an alternate past (the U.S. and U.S.S.R. nuked each other in 1985 so the future’s different)–but then it’s just a traditional future cop sci-fi thing. And it’s pretty good at it too. Writers Kyle Higgins and Alec Siegel just have one major mystery for the cop to solve–who killed his ex-wife’s new husband? Who she initially had an affair with, who got him fired, who shot him four times.

The protagonist is now a painkiller popping wreck of a man. Will he be able to unravel the mystery out in the stars–Hadrian’s Wall refers to the ship where there a limited number of suspects. And we already know someone isn’t what they seem.

Basically, it’s an excuse to look at some gorgeous artwork from Rod Reis. The dialogue is fine–it’s pulpy future cop stuff (and it’s hard to believe it didn’t start as a screenplay)–the characters are okay. The art on them is great. I mean, it’s not an ambitious book, it’s just a solid one.

CREDITS

Writers, Kyle Higgins and Alec Siegel; artist, Rod Reis; letterer, Troy Peteri; editor, Matt Idelson; publisher, Image Comics.

C.O.W.L. 11 (July 2015)

C.O.W.L. #11

I guess C.O.W.L. is over. I really should be reading back matter, apparently, as I went through the issue with no idea it was wrapping up after just two arcs. Especially since the story’s weighted with an emphasis on the supporting cast and not the big plot. It seems like it’s a setup for whatever comes next.

Only nothing comes next.

Higgins and Siegel do all right with most of the issue. The last scene’s odd and a little lame and worse after realizing it’s the last scene in the series. But the rest of the comic has some good scenes and some excellent art from Reis. It’s amazing how he’s able to imply movement in his static, design-oriented work. Wish more people could.

C.O.W.L. never really hit its potential. Higgins and Siegel (and even Reis) developed over the run of the book. It just didn’t run long enough.

CREDITS

The Greater Good, Chapter Five: Coming to Terms; writers, Kyle Higgins and Alec Siegel; artist, Rod Reis; letterer, Troy Peteri; publisher, Image Comics.

C.O.W.L. 10 (May 2015)

C.O.W.L. #10

It’s an okay issue of C.O.W.L.. Higgins and Siegel are doing a bridging issue. Most of the issue is either one person being threatened or another person threatening and so on. There’s some nice art from Reis on it, but it all feels very by the numbers.

The coolest thing has to be the supervillain who looks like Nosferatu and has minions. C.O.W.L. tends not to have particularly good villains (or heroes) when it comes to concepts; Reis rarely gets to do anything exciting. Nosferatu and company, though only in the comic for a couple pages, are pretty exciting.

As for the rest of the comic–with the picket line breaking superhero in the hospital and the police detective out for the truth–doesn’t really connect. Higgins and Siegel don’t have enough material; they present it well enough, however. C.O.W.L. is getting to be sturdy, even when it isn’t compelling.

CREDITS

The Greater Good, Chapter Four: Full Disclosure; writers, Kyle Higgins and Alec Siegel; artist, Rod Reis; letterer, Troy Peteri; publisher, Image Comics.

C.O.W.L. 9 (March 2015)

C.O.W.L. #9

This issue of C.O.W.L. is an excellent bit of work from creators Higgins, Siegel and Reis. First off, Reis’s art really makes the issue. He gets to do talking heads and action, but he has a bunch of variety when it comes to the talking heads. The style fits the conversation and the players beautifully.

Since there’s so much talking heads, it’s important the conversations work and they do. Higgins and Siegel reveal quite a few things–like the murdered guy having a wise to the corruption wife; C.O.W.L. is nine issues in and the writers are still able to expand it naturally.

The sixties Chicago setting–whether in the politics or just the visuals–gets utilized quite well this issue too. It’s beginning to feel like natural. The comic has found a reliable groove.

I just realized–the lack of a frame really helps C.O.W.L.; it’s historical superhero fiction.

CREDITS

The Greater Good, Chapter Three: The High Ground; writers, Kyle Higgins and Alec Siegel; artist, Rod Reis; letterer, Troy Peteri; publisher, Image Comics.

C.O.W.L. 8 (January 2015)

C.O.W.L. #8

There are some definite issues with Reis’s art here. The people don’t look right; he’s maybe trying a new style and it doesn’t take. Or maybe there are just too many people to draw. The issue is a lot of talking heads scenes, no real action besides the introduction of staged supervillains.

Higgins and Siegel spend a little time with every character, which leaves C.O.W.L. feeling like it’s in need of a protagonist, or at least someone to follow through all these scenes. Instead, it’s a lot of different people and the writers handle those scenes pretty well, but it feels like a collection of subplot scenes thrown into one issue.

Not even the cliffhanger, with the supervillains attacking, has much weight. It’s kind of a treading water issue, kind of not. The writers are good with their characters and Reis’s art is mostly strong. The issue just feels slight.

CREDITS

The Greater Good, Chapter Two: Doppler Shift; writers, Kyle Higgins and Alec Siegel; artist, Rod Reis; letterer, Troy Peteri; publisher, Image Comics.

C.O.W.L. 7 (December 2014)

C.O.W.L. #7

The issue starts off a little rocky. Reis gets a big action sequence and it’s all style and no substance. Then Higgins and Siegel gradually ease the substance out of that scene as the rest of the comic progresses. Because they’re now introducing the supervillains, or what goes for a supervillain in C.O.W.L. and things are getting very interesting.

There’s a lot of subplot building, between the murdered union member, the union boss making a deal with the villains, the guy getting out of the hospital. There’s a lot–so much when there’s this thing with one of the regular superheroes and a cop talking, it’s just too much to track. But Higgins and Siegel keep it in line and constantly surprising.

And Reis gets another good action sequence.

Then the cliffhanger brings in a whole other issue, since it’s a reveal no one knows but the reader.

Very cool.

B+ 

CREDITS

The Greater Good, Chapter One: At the Brink; writers, Kyle Higgins and Alec Siegel; artist, Rod Reis; letterer, Troy Peteri; editor, Andy Schmidt; publisher, Image Comics.

C.O.W.L. 6 (November 2014)

C.O.W.L. #6

It’s a gimmick issue, with artist Elsa Charretier filling in. The comic is supposed to be a licensed biography of the Grey Raven from 1962. The best part of the gimmick–conceptually, not in execution–is the sixties advertisements for other modern Image Comics. The ads don’t come off, but the idea is cute.

The big problem with the issue is the disconnect between it being an official biography of a character and what it actually conveys to the reader. The Grey Raven discovers his father isn’t just a corrupt cop, but an actual bank robber. There’s no character development, since Higgins and Siegel are doing their version of a sixties comic… no character development, no subtlety.

It’s a reductive gimmick and doesn’t offer much. It’s still a competent enough outing and Charretier fits the gimmick perfectly. She doesn’t have much detail or compositional ingenuity.

It’s passable, if remarkably unambitious.

CREDITS

Raven’s First Flight!; writers, Kyle Higgins and Alec Siegel; artist, Elsa Charretier; colorist, Rod Reis; letterer, Troy Peteri; editor, Andy Schmidt; publisher, Image Comics.

C.O.W.L. 5 (September 2014)

C.O.W.L. #5

It’s a decent enough issue–with Reis doing a lengthy Sienkiewicz-inspired action sequence–but it’s a little light.

C.O.W.L. is a hard-sell, which makes writers Higgins and Siegel’s accomplishments more significant, because it’s a comic book about a labor union and union politics and union negotiating. The superhero aspect of the comic doesn’t come into play much throughout the issue, with Higgins and Siegel saving it for the finale.

But even then it has a lot to do with the union and its problems.

Most of the art is highly stylized, but Reis never gets in the way of the story. He keeps the talking heads scenes visually interesting. Even with its problems, the issue is impressive. Higgins and Siegel find time for character scenes, they find time for conspiracies, they just don’t have enough A plot for the issue.

Slightness aside, it’s still perfectly good stuff.

CREDITS

Principles of Power, Chapter Five: Sacrifice; writers, Kyle Higgins and Alec Siegel; artist, Rod Reis; letterer, Troy Peteri; editor, Andy Schmidt; publisher, Image Comics.

C.O.W.L. 4 (August 2014)

C.O.W.L. #4

Stéphane Perger joins Reis on the art this issue; their styles compliment one another, but are still distinct. The art is both more stylized and emotive over all and it helps the issue immensely.

As for Higgins and Siegel’s story, it’s phenomenal. They’re apparently comfortable enough in C.O.W.L. to let some subplots rest without getting full recaps and minimal motion. There’s some quiet family drama, there’s some quiet relationship drama. It’s all very quiet; even though it’s about the superheroes picketing the police department.

Real quick–the picket lines meet a predictable conclusion when it’s one law enforcement agency picketing and another one not. Higgins and Siegel find a whole lot to talk about this comic and not much of it has to do with flying men. They aren’t turning C.O.W.L. into a history lesson, they’re instead using it as a discussion piece about history.

The comic’s really shaping up well.

CREDITS

Principles of Power, Chapter Four: Unity; writers, Kyle Higgins and Alec Siegel; artists, Rod Reis and Stéphane Perger; letterer, Troy Peteri; editor, Andy Schmidt; publisher, Image Comics.

C.O.W.L. 3 (July 2014)

C.O.W.L. #3

There’s a lot going on this issue; Higgins and Siegel move between two big plots–the super-powered guys going up against a common gangster (which is against union rules) and then the boss negotiating the new contract with the city–while there are a couple little things going on.

The first little thing ties into the gangster storyline. The female superhero is feeling discounted because of her gender and an unlikely colleague shows up and gives her the chance to work outside the norm. It’s a great little arc because there’s so much Higgins and Siegel get to comment on.

Excellent Reis art–throughout, not just on this storyline–is essential to the issue’s success.

Then there’s a little continuation on one of the previous issue’s soft cliffhangers. It’s an interesting continuation because Higgins and Siegel promote it to the issue’s principal cliffhanger, all very quietly.

C.O.W.L. is showing some definite improvement this issue.

CREDITS

Principles of Power, Chapter Three: Perception; writers, Kyle Higgins and Alec Siegel; artist, Rod Reis; letterer, Troy Peteri; editor, Andy Schmidt; publisher, Image Comics.

C.O.W.L. 2 (June 2014)

C.O.W.L. #2

This issue of C.O.W.L. doesn’t so much have scenes as it has snippets of scenes. The whole thing plays like a movie trailer for itself.

Higgins and Siegel open with the two plainclothes guys dropping on of them’s kids off for school. The kid gives his dad crap for not having a costume. Think it comes back in a dramatic fashion? Big time.

Then there’s some corruption stuff and some scheming stuff. All of these scenes hint at something ominous going on but ominous ongoings don’t make the story move. The characters should make the story move, only Higgins and Siegel barely let the characters breathe. The best scenes in the comic are the conversation scenes wiht the guy investigating the corruption. The political stuff is terrible.

“The West Wing” it ain’t.

Worse, the plainclothes guys stuff is bad because they don’t get enough time.

Luckily, Reis’s art holds up.

CREDITS

Principles of Power, Chapter Two: Self-Deception; writers, Kyle Higgins and Alec Siegel; artist, Rod Reis; letterer, Troy Peteri; editor, Andy Schmidt; publisher, Image Comics.

C.O.W.L. 1 (May 2014)

C.O.W.L. #1

There’s something really neat about C.O.W.L.. Writers Kyle Higgins and Alex Siegel don’t mess around with the setting–it’s early sixties Chicago and there’s a unionized team of superheroes defending the city. But it’s less a superhero comic than a police procedural.

For example, there’s not a lot of emphasis on explaining the characters’ powers. Artist Rod Reis does an awesome, probably digital paint thing, and his panels move fast. There’s no time to waste with exposition about who can do what. Higgins and Siegel seem happy to let the reader figure out the powers when needed, but just to fill pages.

The issue jumps around a lot, from the costumed heroes to the plainclothes ones, and it all has to do with this one case. So there’s that procedural aspect.

There are way too many balls in the air at the end of the issue, but it’s definitely impressive stuff.

CREDITS

Principles of Power, Chapter One: Motivation; writers, Kyle Higgins and Alec Siegel; artist, Rod Reis; letterer, Troy Peteri; editor, Andy Schmidt; publisher, Image Comics.

Nightwing 3 (January 2012)

Nightwing-3-300x460.jpg

Almost there… almost there. Higgins’s Nightwing writing is improving by leaps and bounds. Though the soft cliffhanger is weak and there’s a big irregularity in the timeline (Dick’s parents were alive “five years ago,” meaning Batman’s been through three Robins in four years in the new DC universe?), it’s a decent issue.

Barrows and new co-penciller Eduardo Pansica help a lot. Though it’s still too static in the regular people talking scenes, there are some good pages in this issue. One sequence has Dick tripping out and hallucinating; it looks great.

As far as the plot goes, it’s still old Robin comics recycled, but Higgins earnestly presents it all. Sure, Dick probably won’t take over day-to-day control of a circus and be Nightwing in his off hours, but this issue convincingly presents it as a possibility.

I’m almost onboard, but still wary–Higgins hasn’t exactly proven himself reliable.

CREDITS

Past and Present; writer, Kyle Higgins; pencillers, Eddy Barrows and Eduardo Pansica; inkers, J.P. Mayer, Paulo Siqueira and Eber Ferreira; colorists, Rod Reis and Allen Passalaqua; letterer, Carlos M. Mangual; editors, Katie Kubert and Bobbie Chase; publisher, DC Comics.

Deathstroke 3 (January 2012)

Deathstroke-3.jpg

Oh, silly rich people, you think you’ll ever kill Slade? He has such a cool name. Slade.

This issue of Deathstroke is better than and worse than the previous ones. Higgins has some story, but really… it doesn’t matter. Deathstroke is out to kill someone for something, probably money. But he runs into a seemingly deathless opponent and yada yada.

The issue moves because of the fight scenes, which are very long and badly done. Bennett’s proportions on Deathstroke make me wonder if this comic’s for the Cable audience. Bennett flirts with the Liefeld school of anatomy on occasional, or he just doesn’t know how to draw someone crouching.

There’s also Deathstroke’s sidekick, his Q. He shows up for some banter. It’s not terrible banter either.

The fight scenes make the book pass quickly and the cliffhanger’s not too terrible.

Either Deathstroke is less loathsome or I’m a tad disinterested.

CREDITS

Legacy; writer, Kyle Higgins; penciller, Joe Bennett; inker, Art Thibert; colorist, Jason Wright; letterer, Travis Lanham; editors, Rickey Purdin and Rachel Gluckstern; publisher, DC Comics.

Nightwing 2 (December 2011)

nightwing-2-cover.jpg

Nightwing might be a little better. I mean, not a lot, but a little. Barrows, for example, gets positively ambitious when it comes to page layouts. Maybe he’s been reading some eighties Batman, since Higgins is still ripping them off.

Two big developments this issue—first, Dick Grayson now owns Haly’s Circus. Not sure if he owns the pre-Flashpoint Haley’s Circus too, or just the one with the inexplicably changed name. Second, Haly’s Circus has a secret.

Now, I’m pretty sure Dick once owned Haly’s in the eighties and, if he didn’t, he at least solved its big secret. It’s a shame DC didn’t just reprint the old eighties Robin backups covering the same material, as the art and writing were, you know, good.

Another strange element is all the gratuitous sex in the new DC Universe. Dick hooks up with a bimbo. Yippee.

Still, better than last issue.

CREDITS

Haly’s Wish; writer, Kyle Higgins; penciller, Eddy Barrows; inkers, J.P. Mayer and Paulo Siqueira; colorist, Rod Reis; letterer, Carlos M. Mangual; editors, Katie Kubert and Bobbie Chase; publisher, DC Comics.

Deathstroke 2 (December 2011)

235611_20111015175345_large.jpg

I’ll get to the horrors of Deathstroke in a minute, but first I wanted to cover one of the issue’s revelations about the new DC Universe. Its cable news network is apparently called DCNN. You know, DC News Network.

This “Easter egg” is the kind of lame detail from a bad superhero startup press in the nineties. Shared universe and all that nonsense.

Okay, on to the issue. I’m not being uncomplimentary enough and it’s boring me.

The cover to this issue makes it look like Deathstoke might fight a Transformer.

He doesn’t. He fights a boring guy in a suit for a page. A page is enough, since it at least doesn’t go on long enough for Higgins to write dialogue.

The comic gets stupider this issue. Higgins can’t plot well either. The issue takes place over about ten minutes. All for three bucks.

Deathstroke‘s terrible; let’s move on.

F 

CREDITS

The Carpocalypse; writer, Kyle Higgins; penciller, Joe Bennett; inker, Art Thibert; colorist, Jason Wright; letterer, Travis Lanham; editors, Rickey Purdin and Rachel Gluckstern; publisher, DC Comics.

Nightwing 1 (November 2011)

234599_20110921182720_large.jpg

From the cover of Nightwing, it looks like DC’s employing everyone in the Rob Liefeld school of not understanding human anatomy. Of course, at least Eddy Barrows gets a little better in the comic itself. Not much, but a little.

The problem with the book isn’t Barrows, of course. It’s Kyle Higgins. He read some Batman comics from the seventies and eighties and he’s regurgitating the Dick Grayson Robin backups and DC’s calling it “new.”

Worse than the predictable plotting is the narration. Higgins’s first person narration for Dick Grayson is badly written, more than a little moronic and also fails to make Dick likable. He seems rather inane from his narration; I don’t think he has a single interesting observation.

Nightwing might be my least favorite DC relaunch book so far. Higgins is trying to turn Dick Grayson into Peter Parker at times. It’s uninspired and just plain dumb.

CREDITS

Welcome to Gotham; writer, Kyle Higgins; penciller, Eddy Barrows; inker, J.P. Mayer; colorist, Rod Reis; letterer, Carlos M. Mangual; editors, Katie Kubert and Bobbie Chase; publisher, DC Comics.

Deathstroke 1 (November 2011)

234270_20110917144504_large.jpg

DC Comics, as a major publisher, “proudly presents” Deathstroke? Really?

First off, the writing. Let me get through it. Kyle Higgins isn’t as bad as some of the writers DC has on the New 52. Oh, sure, he’s really lame and can’t write dialogue, but at least he tries. He does try to sound conversational and not declarative. He even succeeds. He writes bad conversational dialogue. He’s leagues better than the guys who can’t write like anything but Frank Miller knockoffs.

But he can’t plot either, maybe because the concept would require some understanding of the human condition to succeed.

And the art? Joe Bennett is a diet Ed McGuinness; he doesn’t sell the forced style. Plus, his references are all Marvel—both J. Jonah Jameson and the Vulture cameo in the book.

Maybe Deathstroke’s all supposed to be a joke.

Even if it is… it’s a bad one.

CREDITS

Back to Basics; writer, Kyle Higgins; penciller, Joe Bennett; inker, Art Thibert; colorist, Jason Wright; letterer, Travis Lanham; editors, Rickey Purdin and Rachel Gluckstern; publisher, DC Comics.

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